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Dihydromyricetin (DHM)

$27.95 $19.95

Hang overs suck. Prevent them with DHM. Take these pills before going to bed and wake up fresh without a hang over. No kidding.

We tried and it works like a charm. Here’s proof from our review: Dihydromyricetin – Another Hangover Cure?

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Dihydromyricetin (DHM) is a natural extract of the Oriental Raisin Tree. (Hovenia Dulcis) DHM has been used for centuries in traditional Chinese medicine as a hangover cure and intoxication blocker. Initial studies concluded that DHM supplements greatly reduces hangover symptoms and negates many of the negative side effects commonly associated with intoxication such as slurred speech, loss of coordination and lowered reaction time without any adverse side effects. Sounds too good to be true, right?

  • PREVENT HANGOVERS – No product is more proven or effective at preventing hangover symptoms including headaches, nausea, brain-fog, and anxiety.
  • PROTECT YOUR LIVER AND BRAIN – Research shows Dihydromyricetin reduces alcohol induced damage to the liver and brain.
  • NO MORE WASTED DAYS – Wake up feeling more refreshed and alert after a night out. Enjoy yourself at night and be productive the next day.
  • MADE IN THE USA – Our Dihydromyricetin is manufactured right here in the USA, in a cGMP certified facility.

Boozing – A science lesson

Your liver processes alcohol at a constant rate. When you consumer more alcohol than your liver can process, the alcohol is released into the bloodstream until your liver can get to it later. When alcohol reaches your brain, it affects two different neurotransmitters. Simply put, neurotransmitters are chemicals your brain cells use to control emotions, movement, behavior and thought processes. Two categories of neurotransmitters are inhibitory and exhibitory. Inhibitory neurotransmitters have a calming effect and “slow” things down. Exhibitory neurotransmitters increase energy levels and brain activity.

One neurotransmitter affected by alcohol is GABA. Alcohol binds to GABA receptors in your brain and amplifies its effect. As the brain receives a stronger message from GABA, you begin to feel calm, and your heart rate slows down. When you continue to drink, GABA signals are amplified further and further. Eventually, you experience loss of motor control, inhibitions are lowered and your speech begins to slur. You now have that feeling of being buzzed or even more, you feel drunk.

How DHM works – More science

Simply stated, Dihydromyricetin blocks alcohol from affecting GABA Receptors. Dihydromyricetin binds to GABA receptors in the brain and blocks the effect alcohol has on GABA receptors. Theoretically, this should reduce certain feelings related to intoxication as alcohol is only amplifying the exhibitory neurotransmitter Glutamate (another neurotransmitter affected by alcohol).

When Dihydromyricetin is taken before drinking, alcohol can’t amplify GABA and you don’t feel as intoxicated. When DHM is taken after drinking, it can accelerate the rate at which one sobers up. DHM also helps to speed up the liver’s ability to process alcohol.

Drunk rats can’t be wrong

Pharmacologist Jing Liang of UCLA did a research project on DHM to test the effectiveness on rats. Liang first tested whether DHM blocks the clumsiness and loss of coordination caused by drinking too much. To do this, she measured how long it took for treated rats to right themselves after being laid on their backs in a V-shaped cradle.

After she injected rats’ abdomens with a dose of alcohol proportionate to the amount a human would get from downing 15 to 20 beers in two hours by a human, they took about 70 minutes, on average, to right themselves. However, when an injection of the same amount of booze included a milligram of DHM per kilogram of rat body weight, the animals recovered their composure within just five minutes.

Liang also discovered that DHM stopped rats in a maze from behaving in ways resembling anxiety and hangovers. Rats given heavy doses of alcohol cowered away in corners of the maze, whereas those given the extract with their alcohol behaved normally and were as inquisitive as rats given no alcohol at all, exploring the more open corridors of the maze.

Drunken rats can’t be wrong, can they?